Sing, Sang, Sung – “Daydream Believer” By The Monkees (R.I.P. Davy Jones)

Today, I had originally planned on talking about some political stuff, like how Rick Santorum’s an idiot… or maybe even finally reviewing a Tuscaloosa restaurant… But, earlier today, I heard the news that former Monkees member Davy Jones died at age 66 of a heart attack.

Just a mere eight days ago, I was introducing people to The Monkees with a song many had likely never heard, “Shades of Gray.” If you couldn’t tell from that post, The Monkees are a definite favorite of mine. I always tell people when they ask me for my favorite bands that The Monkees were my first favorites, and therefore they will always have a place in my heart.

Paul Levinson wrote a touching and true column about how important The Monkees were to culture… Not mentioned in the column is how Jack Nicholson’s career may not have gotten started without them, as he wrote their (commercially failed) movie “Head.” Not mentioned is how The Monkees took the transformative power of The Beatles’ early works and kept it going with fervor in America, bringing it to an even wider audience through television, and paving the way for (love it or hate it) American pop.

Not mentioned are the fun little tales that color the history of The Monkees. How they had the relatively unknown Jimi Hendrix Experience open for them in concert… one of the worst decisions ever made in the music industry. Hendrix threw his guitar into the confused, unexcited, Monkees-manic crowd and quit mid-tour. Or how they hung out with The Beatles, who introduced The Monkees to marijuana (themselves having been introduced to it by Bob Dylan). Or how Neil Diamond’s career was started by writing the No. 1 Monkees hit “I’m A Believer.”

Jones had, by himself, some interesting stories to add to the lore. Jones had acted at a young age, and continued until his mother died at age 14. He then decided, being a rather small person, that he wanted to be a jockey. He trained for some time before acting caught up to him again and he was cast in the musical “Oliver!” as the Artful Dodger. He played the role to great success in the West End (he was British) before coming to America and performing on Broadway. He was even nominated for a Tony Award. Then, in a strange twist of fate, he and the rest of the “Oliver!” cast were invited to appear on “The Ed Sullivan Show” the same night The Beatles made their first American appearance. Jones got to watch history and Beatlemania in the making.

And, from there, The Monkees and history of his own. He sang many of the lead vocals for some of the best known, most adored Monkees songs, such as the pure vocals in “I Wanna Be Free.” And he joined with Peter Tork for the vocals of “Shades of Gray,” the song I mentioned a week ago and earlier in this article. But perhaps the best known example of his voice in The Monkees was the hit “Daydream Believer,” a song that made many young women realize how desperately they were crushing on the little guy. He is a talent this world will miss.

“Daydream Believer” – The Monkees

Oh, I could hide ‘neath the wings of the bluebird as she sings
The six o’clock alarm would never ring
But it rings and I rise, wipe the sleep out of my eyes
The shavin’ razor’s cold, and it stings

Cheer up, sleepy Jean, oh what can it mean
To a daydream believer and a homecoming queen?

You once thought of me as a white knight on his steed
Now you know how happy I can be
Oh, and our good times start and end without dollar one to spend
But how much baby do we really need?

Cheer up, sleepy Jean, oh what can it mean
To a daydream believer and a homecoming queen?
Cheer up, sleepy Jean, oh what can it mean
To a daydream believer and a homecoming queen?

Cheer up, sleepy Jean, oh what can it mean
To a daydream believer and a homecoming queen?
Cheer up, sleepy Jean, oh what can it mean
To a daydream believer and a homecoming queen?

Cheer up, sleepy Jean, oh what can it mean
To a daydream believer and a homecoming queen?

Tagged , , , , , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 321 other followers

%d bloggers like this: